Accession No

3297


Brief Description

demonstration model of hexagonal close-packing (HCP) structure; [English], 20th century


Origin

[England]


Maker


Class

chemistry; crystallography; demonstration


Earliest Date

Jan. 1, 1900


Latest Date

Dec. 31, 1985


Inscription Date


Material

wood; metal (steel)


Dimensions

length 154mm; breadth 154mm; height 160mm


Special Collection


Provenance

Transferred from Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, 11/1985.


Inscription


Description Notes

Hexagonal wooden base supporting model of hexagonal close-packing (HCP) structure, consisting of white-painted wooden spheres on steel rods.

condition good (some rusting of rods); complete


References

Ruth Horry; 'Space-filling models'; Explore Whipple Collections online article; Whipple Museum of the History of Science; University of Cambridge; 2008: https://www.whipplemuseum.cam.ac.uk/explore-whipple-collections/models/modelling-chemistry/types-molecular-models


Events

Description
There are several main types of atomic models in use today. Two of the most common are 'ball and spoke' and 'space-filling' types. Each model type displays different information about molecules. Whilst ball and spoke models are designed to show how the atoms bond together, space-filling models accurately demonstrate the size and shape of the molecule. This space filled model packs the atoms together in an arrangement known as hexagonal close-packing (HCP). Chemistry students use space-filling models to help when visualising whether the shape of certain bulky structures will prevent them reacting with other molecules. One disadvantage of space-filling type is that the model does not clearly demonstrate how the atoms bond together. This model was made by Griffin and George, a company that designed mass-produced models for students learning chemistry. It was acquired by the Museum from the Cavendish Laboratory at University of Cambridge.
10/03/2014
Created by: Allison Ksiazkiewicz on 10/03/2014


FM:40537

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